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in the morning, and at the end of the day, they're dead. >> with them, street to stree, as they fight assad's army. >> we are returning now, after the attack. it just shows you how brave they are, and at the same time, how disorganized they are. >> guardicorrespondent for frontlinghaith abdul-ahad, takes you inside the battle for syria. and later tonight, the regime responds. >> the regime now is bombarding civilian neighborhoods with artillery, with tank fire, and with fighter bombers. >> how is president bashar al-assad holding on to power? >> the iranians are gaining influence in syria now by the day. >> and what will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. majofundinis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and
to publicly call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan has played a leading role in trying to begin a political transition toward a new government. we're working together to strengthen a credible syrian opposition. we share jordan's concerns about violence spilling across the borders. so i want to take this opportunity to make it clear the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. as has been mentioned during this crisis the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of so many refugees inevitably is showing. every day -- to neighbors far from home, but this is a heavy burden. and the international community needs to step up to make sure that they are helping to shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped people here in jordan. and today i'm announcing that my administration will work with congress to provide jorda
by the bashar al-assad regime. president obama expressing frustration with those who question the president about why the united states is not doing more to intervene in the syrian conflict. >> it is fair to say that the united states often finds itself in a situation where does criticize militarily. if we don't go in militarily, then people ask why we are not doing something. lou: senator carl levin, pushing president obama to take a hands-on approach to the removal of bashar al-assad. and as senator john mccain looking for a no-fly zone to be instituted. while calling for surgical airstrikes to help drive the bashar al-assad. the president repeated that any evidence of this weapon to use would be a game changer, as he put it. president obama defended his administration's reluctance to use military force to quell the syrian civil war. >> when we are working with the syrians themselves, so this is not externally imposed, but rather something that is linked directly with the aspirations of the people inside of syria, it will work better. lou: the king has also said the same. inside jordan co
leader to publicly call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence that was being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan has played a leading role in trying to begin a political transition toward a new government. while working together to strengthen a credible, syrian opposition. we share jordan's concerns about violence spilling across the border. so i want to take this opportunity to make it clear the united states is committed to the security of jordan. which is backed by our strong alliance. as has been mentioned during this crisis, the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of so many refugees inevitably is showing. every day -- [ inaudible ] >> to neighbors far from home, but this is a heavy burden. and international community needs to step up to make sure that they are helping to shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped people here in jordan. and today i'm announcing that my administration will
bashar assad eventually leaves there is a risk extremists will take over. >> they thrive in failed states. they thrive in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to actually building things but they are very good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functioning. >> shepard: and no matter how this unfolds, the president says the outcome in syria is not going to be ideal our chief white house correspondent traveling with live in amman jordan. the president is getting more pressure to use military in syria. >> he he is the president wept out and vowed that he would rid asyria of all the extremist still left there a sign that he is ready to kill more people. is he digging in even deeper president obama is getting pressure no-fly zone. come up with surgical air strikes. something to stop the killing. but the president today said at a news conference you have to be very careful with u.s. power. >> what your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily. and, you know, i think it's fair to say that the united states often finds its
in just the. >> what is going to happen? >> ultimately bashar assad will fall. the timing the precise scenario are not known. but the rebels are encroaching. they control more ter another-- territory. they have half of aleppo. they are fighting in the outskirts of damascus am we can see the regime becomes more desperate with its back to the world, may or may not have used chemical weapons. but the calculus is the calculus of desperate -- >> may or may not have used chemical weapons. certainly not in an extent that might be powerful and that might change as the president said, be a game changer. they haven't used him that way. >> right. >> do you believe they would use them that way? that is not-- it's not they. the people bashar assad and those that are supporting him believe that that is the only thing they have left. >> they have made so many mistakes in the past two years that i can't really doubt. it would be a terrible act and a terrible mistake but i can't rule it out. >> rose: i think that they're testing obama. they are testing this red line that obama has put down. they have
bomber blew up a damascus mosque killing 42 people including a prominent sheikh who supports the assad regime. opposition leaders denied all responsibility. this is just another sign of vulnerability in a regime that has thousands of chemical weapons. today president obama warned assad and his forces that the world is watching. the president said they will be held accountable if they use chemical weapons or let them fall into the hands of terrorists. but in secret testimony this week, congressional committees were told some of these deadly weapons are, in effect, locked and loaded. and that the regime plans to use them. israeli intelligence agrees, i'm told, and believe the trigger could well be if aleppo, syria's largest city, falls to the rebels. if that were to happen, the president and netanyahu have military plans in place to stop the weapons from getting into the hands of terrorists. and of course, brian, the other big concern for the u.s. and israel is iran. just today iran's supreme leader threatened to level israeli cities if israel sights the nuclear program. lots to worry ab
said he was worried syria could become a haven for muslim extremists -- when, not if president assad is ousted. he urged the international community to work together to make sure there is a credible opposition ready to step into the breach. >> the final leg of barack obama's tour of the middle east will be dominated by one issue. with the conflict in syria on going, jordan is worried violence could spill across the border. >> just a few hours earlier, the u.s. president made his final stop in israel. he visited the holocaust memorial. afterwards, he spoke out about -- against antisemitism. >> for us, in our time, this means confronting bigotry and hatred in all of its forms -- racism, especially anti- semitism. none of that has a place in the civilized world. >> it was a sign from obama that america still stands by israel. he also visited the grave of one of the founders of the modern zionist political movement, which was key in the creation of the israeli state. but obama also wanted to bring the issue of reconciliation between israel and palestine to the fore. the president visited
is worried what will happen in the country of the deadly assad regime is out. president obama's comments came of the president assad pledged to wipe out forces of darkness from his country, following the reports of a suicide has' last night at a damascus mosque, including a cleric who supported the syrian regime. this is the first time in thesive war that a suicide bomber has struck inside a house of worship, and the sunni cleric who was injured -- or killed, reportedly the most senior religious figure killed in the entirety of the conflict. president assad vowed revenge. we will destroy their extremism until we have cleansed the country. little doubt the syrian leader is referring to the rebel fighters. the opposition denying anything to do with the attack. ed henry is with the president. >>> ed, president obama is under a lot of pressure to take some military action in syria. >> that's right, including from some fellow democrats, who like carl levin, if not boots on the ground, at least a no-fly zone. senator levin and joining senator john mccain there could be surgical astrikes. the presid
are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. i'm confident that assad will go. it is not a question of if. it is when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what is the aftermath? for the american people we have to recognize we have a stake here. >> a half million syrian refugees have fled to jordan. a nation already dependent on foreign aid including $13 billion from the u.s. king abdullah says assad's days are numbers but fears islam rule could emerge in its place. chuck todd is traveling with the president and asking the president as many questions as he wants. that's how chuck todd gets down. chuck, i have one question for you. what is going on in your world right now? >> well, it has been a pretty busy day. you brought up the issue of syria and this is classic all politics is local issue when it comes to jordan. this issue of syrian refugees and the economic toll it is taking on the country is clearly the number one item on the king's agenda. he equated it. he made an interesting little parallel. he said they may get
administration to use patriot missiles to degrade the assad regime's air power and the chair and ranking members of the house intelligence committee have introduced a bill calling for the administration to arm syrian rebels. asked today about whether the united states would provide a more aggressive military response to the syrian crisis, the president would only say this. >> the united states often finds itself in a situation where if it goes in militarily then it's criticized for going in militarily. and if it doesn't go in militarily then people say why aren't you doing something militarily, and, you know, my response at this stage is to make sure that what we do contributes to bringing an end to the bloodshed as quickly as possible. >> joining me now is nbc's peteral exandriny. >> the president wraps up his four-day visit to the middle east tomorrow. with renewed pressure to handle the crisis in syria, a nation he's not visiting, what is the effect of this trip been on that issue, do you think? >> reporter: well, i think we've got a pretty good sense of it as i was there in the news conferen
are being used in syria by the assad regime or by rebel groups? what do you think? >> i don't know but chairman rogers, highly respected chairman of the intelligence committee has access to information that very select leaders have in this country. so when he is drawing a conclusion it is likely it is probable, i think we have to take him at his word. i believe also before our government would take any action, they would have to actually confirm that chemical weapons were used. heather: you know syrian president assad, he released some pictures, he released some video. i have, i believe we have some of that, that he says proves that rebel forces used chemical weapons on this attack. he alleges it happened on march 19th in aleppo. just from you viewing this video, taking a look at these pictures, can you yourself tell, i mean, you can't tell if chemical weapons were in fact used here but president assad says this is proof. >> well certainly doctors after a period of time would be able to determine that to be sure. whether we could get accurate information from assad's medical system
before assad goes. jessica yellin is live from amman, jordan where that press conference just wrapped. jessica, the president said assad would go but sounded perhaps a little annoyed about being asked how that might happen. why was he seemingly annoyed? >> well, jake, we counted and this is the sixth time that the president or a member of his administration has said assad must go just in the last month alone. but none of them has laid out a plan or a path for direct action by the united states to help remove assad from power. without any direct military intervention by the u.s. the president knows he is vulnerable to criticism. that he is standing by while a massacre is taking place and that is a particularly sharp and poignant charge when he is standing here in jordan where they are providing refuge to some 7,000 syrians who are fleeing for safety every day. some 7,000 people crossing the border into jordan from syria each day because of the violence there. >> i believe the king abdullah of jordan said that the settlements of refugees now form something like the fifth largest town in
-- in iraq. >> of syria, we got off on the wrong foot. the president declared publicly that assad of syria has to go. that was a trustee had to make. that he made. one would assume that declaring a publicly involves a commitment by the united states, which the united states is prepared then to make effective. and that therefore we have the means and strategy for achieving and objective. -- that objective. as soon turned out this was rhetorical, without a real capacity for follow-through. so we went to the un and demanded the security council support us on this. andrussians and chinese said we do not share this conclusion and we will not join you in forcing assad out and we object of the resolution fell. the russians and chinese, having engaged in this stance that is infantile and disgusting, the words used by our ambassador to the un, which is not a way of soliciting their report for -- their support for further comment policy. policy.n it became clear that the opposition, some of it involves some of our friends, some of it involves the infiltration of al qaeda types into syria. some of it
join the effort of others to arm the opposition? how long will assad stay in power? that changes on almost a day-to-day basis because the situation is so uncertain as it enters the third year. the president is a bit defensive because people ask where was the world's biggest super power? you are supposed to be the voice of humanitarian needs around the world. how could you let this go on so long? why haven't you done more? the president said today at the news conference the united states from the start was calling on assad to step down and we know if you look at the calendar it is simply not true. many other countries were ahead of the united states in calling for assad to step down but it's a tough one for the president. he is right in the sense the united states used military force in this region from the beginning, there is still a big hangover from the iraq war in this part of the world. it would have been controversial. all the choices are difficult. he does get a bit defensive when that question is posed, wolf. >> he certainly does at least that is the impression you get fro
his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is a kinship between shia and alouites, is a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within their record to help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like rushing, when-- hen am's regine, and we people see an uprising in spirit, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? it is simplistic to say that -- more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat -- islamists in iraq see the th reat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. is this fear o
was an outspoken supporter of assad. >>> a major shut down has been confirmed for the third largest school district in the nation. chicago mayor rahm emanuel i announced thursday the city will plan 54 schools which is 8% of the district. the mayor called the closings a tough but necessary choice citing many half empty public school buildings. opponents who turned out to protest said the closures will endanger students in troubled areas who may have to cross gang boundaries to attend classes. they think the closures will save millions. >>> gun legislation set to hit the senate floor next month will include universal background checks. this according to harry reid who introduced the bill last night. he's vowing that any bill that passes the senate must include background checks. the most contentious part of the measure. reid promised votes on a proposed assault weapons ban and limits on high capacity magazines. the legislation aims to make gun trafficking a federal crime and strengthen safety measures at schools. yesterday john lennon was thrust into the gun debate. his widow drew attention to the ca
of for a key bashar al-assad. .e was a sunni muslim the u.s. has opposed sanctions imposed sanctions on a rebel group in northern mali. they have banned americans from doing business with it. the group was recently pushed out of northern mali french-led troops. two italian marines accused of killing a pair of indian fishermen last year are being sent back to india to face charges. >> the two men are being sent back to india. they are accused of shooting dead two fishermen off india's southern coast in february of last year. >> italy has informed to us they will be sending back the marines to india. marines had been part of a military security team protecting this tanker. they say they fired on the fishermen thinking they were pirates. dead deaths -- the deaths demonstrations. the families of the dead have been demanding compensation and they want the marines tried in india. i would urge the indian government and the court to give us justice. marines have twice been allowed to leave india on bail. the second time, they did not come back. the italian government refused to return the pair, despite
who called for active approach to take out president bashar assad, from no-fly zone to airstrike. >> it's tragic. it's heart-breaking. the sight of children and women being slaughtered that we have seen so much i think has to compel all of us to say what more can we do? >> king abdullah is also under pressure. since a refugee camp alone is now the fifth largest city in jordan. there is also fear extremists will spread chemical weapons from syria to jordan and israel. abdullah resisted any foreign military intervention and today visibly winced as a reporter asked if it would provide asylum. the president tid penal is $200 million more in u.s. taxpayer assistance to jordan for refugee and scored diplomatic victory by getting israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu to patch things up by phone with his turkish counterpart after a bitter spat that could have hendered u.s. efforts to get turkey's help on syria. the president visited the church of the nativity in bethlehem and continued outreach to the people. although a stop at the holocaust museum in jerusalem may have provided a ch
. but maliki has his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is it the kinship between shia and alouites, is it a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within iraq? help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like saddam's regime, when people see an uprising in syria, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? it is simplistic to say that -- more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. it is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on th
civil war, to the north. the king was the first arab leader to call on bashar al- assad to go, and is cooperating with the u.s. and others to make that happen. jordan reportedly hosts u.s. and other special forces training the ragtag syrian rebels. but the pressures come from a flood of syrian refugees. some 460,000 now, housed in squalid refugee camps, and the numbers keep growing. >> how are you going to turn back women, children and the wounded? this is something that we just can't do. it's not the jordanian way. the problem is obviously the burden it's having on jordan. we've tried to quantify it as much as possible. the latest figure says it's going to cost roughly $550 million a year. not only is that a problem, but it's going to be a tremendous strain, obviously, on infrastructure, and it's creating social problems and security problems. >> warner: there are strains on jordan too from the fact an estimated half of all jordanians are palestinians from the west bank. so king abdullah has long urged the u.s. to get re-engaged in trying to bring peace between israelis and p
supporter of syrian president al-assad and the most senior figure to die in syria's civil war. >>> a major shut down is confirmed for the third largest school district in the nation. ram he manu you' emanuel said th but necessary choice. opponents who turned out to protest yesterday said the closures will only endanger students in troubled areas who may have to cross gang boundaries to attend classes. the consolidation will save $560 million over ten years. >>> gun legislation set to hit the senate floor next month will include universal background checks. this according to harry reid who introduced the bill on the senate floor last night. the top senate democrat is vowing that any bill that passes the senate must include background checks, the most contentious portion of the measure. reid also promised votes on proposed assault weapons ban. the legislation also aims to make gun trafficking a federal crime and strengthen safety measures at schools. >>> and just yesterday, the late beetle john lennon was thrust into the gun debate when his widow drew attention to the cause tweeting a photo
for their neighbors. his majesty was the first arab leader to publicly call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan took a leading role in the political transition to a more stable government. we are looking at strengthening the syrian opposition. we share concerns about violence spilling across the borders. i want to make it clear. the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. the jordanian people have mixed -- have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of some many refugees inevitably is showing. they are far from home, but this is a heavy burden. need the international community to step up and help shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are these single largest donor of assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped jordan, and for days i have been announcing that my administration will provide jordan with an additional $200 million in budget support as it cares for syrian refugees and jordanian communities affected by t
a syrian mosque. the 84-year-old preacher was one of the few prominent supporters of president bashar assad. >>> in the mediterranean nation of cypress people lined up to get money out of atm machines, trying to get whatever cash they can. cypress has until money to put a bailout plan in place in the face of a threatened pullout by the european central bank. some banks have closed their doors to avoid mass withdrawals. pressure to reject a proposal to fees as much as 10% of people's savings accounts. >>> a wrong way driver speeding down a bay area interstate. also, a south bay preschool teacher accused of spiking sippy cups. the charges filed today against her. >> bill martin working on his weekend forecast at 10:45, back with that, and our next chance for rain. >> up first, striking musicians walked the picket line. the point they tried to illustrate as they missed a big concert date. >>> the highway patrol says officers to do arrested a man after he drove the wrong way reaching speeds of up to 72 miles per hour. the driver was identified as 60- year-old joseph john brignolo of san bruno.
" bulletin. >>> u.s. intelligence officials now believe the assad regime in syria did not use chemical weapons on its own people. despite claims by rebel forces that those weapons were used, officials tell cnn there are multiple indicators that they were not deployed. >>> president obama is on an out of state dinner in israel marking the close ties between the u.s. and israel. he was awarded the presidential medal of distinction, israel's highest civilian honor. >>> major change coming to chicago. 53 underutilized public schools will be closed. officials say the money saved will be used to install air conditioning in other school facilities, invested in libraries and used to buy ipads for students in grades 3 through 8. >>> a man in australia himself a new father says instinct kicked in when a mom in a supermarket screamed her baby wasn't breathing. although not trained in cpr, he came to the child's aid to clear her airway, listened to instructions from paramedics over the phone and saved the child's life. >> wow. >>> the $500 million question, who is behind the biggest art heist in h
. at the same time, both president obama and king abdullah have called for president assad to accept down and have made it clear that they don't see much of a future for him in running that country. >> always good to see you. thanks so much. >> today's tweet of the day has to do with march madness. in case you didn't hear, 14th seed harvard earned its first ever ncaa victory last night. so today this is what the harvard lampoon tweeted -- america, we are sorry for messing up your brackets and your financial system and everything else. seed harvard earned its first >>> hard to believe it's been ten years since the shock and au campaign that laufrgesed the iraq war. i was on the air as it was all unfolding. this clip is from the morning after the war began. >> let's get you up to date on what is happening. it started at 9:30 eastern time last night when president bush gave the order and attacks were made against leadership targets, saddam hussein in a bunker around baghdad. and since then, a lot of activity for those troops massed along the iraq kuwaiti border. they have gotten some scares
assad can hang on? an update on syria the most important item here. >> what was really accomplished, john, in this trip overall? >> reporter: you know, you have to say, don, i think what was accomplished is important foundations were set down. we'll see in the weeks and months ahead whether they produced the results the president wants. let's go through one of them, very important, not on the schedule. that was the president brokering a call this morning, between the israeli prime minister and the turkish prime minister. two traditional allies who have not had normal relations for about three years now. remember, that gaza blockade, israeli commandos killed some turks on a boat out, trying to bring humanitarian aid to gaza, relations broke off. the president brokered a call this morning in which prime minister netanyahu apologized to prime minister erdogan, promised to bring restitution to the families back in the united states. to have them back, back on the same page, is very, very important. also comparing notes with the israeli leadership about the diplomacy with iran over its n
. at least 42 people were killed, among them a top sunni muslim cleric who supported president bashar assad. iran appeared today to open the door to possible direct talks with the u.s. over its nuclear program. the supreme ayatollah ali khamenei said he is not opposed to talks, but he also said he is not optimistic they'd accomplish much. he also repeated iran's claim that its nuclear programs are for peaceful purposes. a car bomb killed 13 people waiting in line for food at a refugee camp in pakistan today. hundreds were lined up for food rations at the jalozai camp in northwest pakistan when the bomb went off. an aid worker and a security guard were among those killed. 25 others were injured. many of the refugees at the camp have been displaced by fighting along the afghan border between the pakistani army and the taliban. a jailed kurdish leader in turkey called for an immediate truce today in one of the world's longest and bloodiest insurgencies. a huge crowd of kurds danced and cheered as abdullah ocalan's letter directing his forces to withdraw from turkey was read aloud. his worker'
the conflict ends and assuming that assad steps aside. however, translating that political imperative into discreet military steps and actions is actually quite difficult. in has been a lot of talk. john mccain has talked repeatedly over the last two years about establishing a no-fly zone. that involves an act of war that brings the united states as a combatant into the syrian civil war. it may well become necessary but it is not a step that you must take lightly. somebody else in congress has suggested, insert american forces to guard the chemical weapons sites. i mean, one of the driving factors in military action is forced protection. how are you going to protect these discreet elements? we think we can define it politically as a narrow mission but in fact, the net result is bringing the united states as a full combatant into this conflict. >> and do we even know where all the sites are at this point? >> the united states knows where the sites are, yes. the united states is saying we're monitoring these situations and we have confidence that the syrians still have positive control
war. the assad regime and rebel forces accusing each other of chemical war fair, but u.s. military officials tell cnn their intelligence suggests neither side used those weapons. >>> 183 air traffic control towers on the chopping block. today we learn which ones the faa will shut down. some of the towers are practically brand new. blame the four spending cuts for all of this. the towers handle low to moderate amounts of air traffic and use mostly contract workers as well. >> a combination of technical and communications breakdowns are blamed for the power loss at the super bowl. the power caused a more than half-hour delay between the baltimore ravens and san francisco 49ers. according to an independent analysis, a design defect in a recently installed relay device caused the power to trip. they had trouble reaching the manufacturer to solve the problem. >> hopefully it won't happen again. >>> sow, how is that bracket holding up for you? the first full day of the ncaa tournament delivering the first huge upset. 14th seed harvard pulling off a stunner in salt lake city new york knoc
and it will be very critical that if there are chemical weapons being used by the assad regime president obama responds accordingly. that is another red line he is drawing. that is red line irisraelies will be watching and iranians. is this president serious about committing to red lines and honoring the red lines. uma: quickly with obama speaking to young people in israel, that was very interesting strategy on his part because he knows he often does well in those kind of settings, at that type of theater backdrop. >> i think that's right. president obama shown in the u.s. context he is he is brilliant at grassroots activism and getting support of the grassroots. he tried to go over the head of prime minister netanyahu. he tried to appeal to the grassroots to build political support, get beyond a 10% approval rating. he will need that and support of israeli people if he will is for israelies to take significant risks for peace with respect to the palestinians. uma: you used that word over, risk, over and over again. >> there is risk on israeli borders. missiles from the north. missiles from th
was the first arab leader to call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence that was being inflicted on the syrian people and jordan has played a leading role and trying to begin a political transition towards a new government and we're working to strength and credible syrian opposition. we share jordan's concerns about violence spilling across the border so i want to take this opportunity to make it clear the united states is committed to the security of jordan which is backed by our strong alliance. as has been mentioned during this crisis, the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of so many refugees inevitably is showing. every day-- the neighbors far from home, this is a heavy burden, and the international community needs to step up to make sure that they're helping to shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are already the single-- >>. >> we've been listening to president obama with king abdullah and they've been talking about the allegiance to each other, or alliance i should say. and the syrian confl
struggling with more than 400,000 syrian refugees who have crossed. assad is bowing to wipe out extremists. among the dozens killed was a 84-year-old cleric who is one of his strongest supporters. eighty-four people were wounded in the explosion. a marine shot and killed two other marines before turning the gun on himself. the shooter was a staff member at the quantico school. the two victims, a male and female, were both active duty marines. this comes just three days after seven marines were killed in a training accident in nevada. those are your headlines. back to melissa and adam. melissa: thank you. farmland prices doubling in the u.s. does this signal a bubble brewing in america's heartland? jeff flock is in grundy county, illinois. jeff: want to buy a farm, melissa? melissa: sure, why not. jeff: we are talking about investing in farmland. a lot of people on wall street are doing it right now. take a look at this piece of ground. 160-acre parcel in grundy county, illinois, corn and beans, do what ever you want around here. i have a man who makes his business making loans to farmers.
and closer to some sort of multilateral action, particularly if there is a confirmation that the assad regime in syria has used chemical weapons in violation of international law and basic humanitarian rights. i think it was vital that president obama went to israel at this critical moment. it was a great speech and reaffirmation of a fundamental relationship in particular that he recognized that israel is a jewish home land and a right to exist and self-defense in face of both a iranian nuclear weapons program. it is a very unstable situation in syria and in the region. this was a vital important moment for president obama, both to reassure the israeli people that we are their most vital ally, that we have an unshakeable relationship but also to urge forward a peace process that could help stabilize the region. >> dr. brzezinski, off of what senator coons just said, we have this decades old issue of trying to come up with a peace settlement within israel. yet, right now, the area, the fuses around israel so volatile and fast burning. syria, jordan, iran, egypt. talk about the degree of diffi
, a major issue obama said it's a game changer if assad uses chemical weapons and the u.s. has to be very careful they have accurate information on that. the pressure they have militarily if they do. >> people are still dying every day. chemical weapons or no. >> that's what we get into the debate, what kind of munitions were used. we treat chemical weapons that are used and people in syria who are killed probably might not see such a difference. if we should intervene no matter what. >> we'll continue this trip on "starting point." >>> ready for blackberry. long awaited launch. >> have you noted that the winter weather is sticking around a long time? punxsutawney phil could be in serious trouble for the early spring prediction. a lawyer is suing the groundhog. a lawyer. who passed the bar. on "starting point." back in a moment. nnouncer ] a classic macaroni & cheese from stouffer's starts with freshly-made pasta, and 100% real cheddar cheese. but what makes stouffer's mac n' cheese best of all. that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. made with care for you or your family. to book t
's why i'm quite skeptical about it right now. >>brian: what's the worst scenario? that assad is using it as the government in charge or that the rebels have it? and we know inside the rebel organization, if you can call it that, are muslim extremists? >> absolutely. they're both bad because once one uses it, the other side will use it. the real danger is hezbollah gets it and would use it on israel. that's the great fear that i have. >>brian: general, how do you know all this stuff about agents? was that a focus of yours? >> i used to be in command of a unit that used to have that mission before we signed the chemical weapons treaty. i'm intimately familiar with using them, storing them, putting them on airplanes. this is with fighters we had them. and that is a very difficult area to work on. and i had a great deal of experience with that. of course we no longer use them and it's no longer in our inventory. >>brian: we know the president said that's a red line. we think we know where this stuff is housed. can we go with an airstrike, blow it up and not poison the surrounding populati
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